8 %
OFF
8 %
OFF
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-2
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-6
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-5
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-4
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-3
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-14
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-13
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-12
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-11
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-10
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-9
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-8
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-7
  • Amazing-Ubud-Half-Day-Tour-1

Amazing Ubud Half Day Tour

Rated 0 out of 5
0 customer reviews

RM240.1

Group Activity
Fixed Date Ticket
Hotel Transfer
Food & Drinks
Insurance Included
Over 4 hours
Earn Points
Adult (11 -65 years old)
RM240.1

Total : RM0

What’s Included

  • Access to Amazing Ubud Half Day Tour
    • Tegenungan Waterfall
    • Elephant Cave (Goa Gajah Temple)
    • Ubud Art Market (Celuk Village, Batuan Village and Mas Village)
    • Ubud Monkey Forest
    • Balinese Coffee Plantation
    • Tegallalang Rice Terraces
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • All entrance tickets
  • Local donations
  • Meals: Lunch
  • Bottled water
  • Insurance
  • Hotel transfers
    • Nusa Dua, Kuta, Sanur, Ubud, Canggu, Tanah Lot
  • English-speaking guide

Important Info

  • The minimum booking for this attraction / activity is 2 pax
  • Attraction / Activity Duration: 7 hours
  • Child Range: Age 10 and below
  • Not suitable for children under age 3 years and adults above the age of 65 years
  • Adult Range: Age 11 and above
  • Minimum age for this attraction / activity is 3 years old and must be accompanied by an adult

Amazing Ubud Half Day Tour

Ubud is a popular village in the centre of Bali. The region has become famous because of its surrounding natural beauty. Whether it’s rice fields like Tegalalang, countless waterfalls, unique art villages or hiking up to Mount Batur, everyone is wowed by the beauty there.

Ubud is a remarkable town in the middle of the island of Bali. It has been the island’s preeminent centre for fine arts, dance, and music for more than a century. While it once was a haven for scruffy backpackers, cosmic seekers, artists and bohemians, Ubud is now a hot spot for literati, glitterati, art collectors and connoisseurs.

Ubud is not “ruined”. Its character is too strong to be destroyed. It still draws people who add something, actively involved in art, nature, anthropology, music, dance, architecture, environmentalism, “alternative modalities,” and more.

Ubud is arguably the best place to use as a base if plan on visiting Bali and looking for culture, comfort, nature, and inspiration. Ubud is surrounded by most things that bring people to Bali.Scenic rice fields, small villages, art and craft communities, ancient temples, palaces, rivers, cheap accommodation and unique luxury hotels. And it’s central location makes it easy to get from Ubud to the mountains, beaches, and major towns.

Tegenungan Waterfall

Tegenungan Waterfall is a great attraction for nature lovers staying in Ubud or having neighbouring Sukawati among their sightseeing itineraries. The waterfall is halfway between Ubud and Bali’s provincial capital of Denpasar. It is considered the closest natural attraction that you can reach within a half-hour drive southeast of Ubud central.

You can go down to the vast pebbly base and enjoy a plunge pool, but this is not advised after heavy downpours due to the risk of flash floods. There are restaurants here that serve excellent local dishes, such as the signature Balinese-style crispy fried duck, which serve as good spots to hang out before or after heading down to Tegenungan Waterfall.

Elephant Cave (Goa Gajah Temple)

The Goa Gajah ‘Elephant Cave’ is an archaeological site on the cool western borders of Bedulu Village, 6 km out of central Ubud. To the unknowing, Goa Gajah’s name can be slightly misleading, often creating an impression that the site is a gigantic dwelling full of elephants.

Even though Goa Gajah translates to ‘Elephant Cave’, you won’t find any pachyderms here. Various theories suggest the origin of the name. One is based on the Petanu River being originally called ‘Lwa Gajah’ before being called Petanu River. Other sources state that the ‘Gajah’ or elephant aspect came in from the stone figure inside the cave, which depicted the Hindu god Ganesh, who is characterised bearing an elephant’s head.

The cave’s entrance shows a menacing giant face with its wide-open mouth as the door. Various motifs depicting the forest and animals are carved out of the outer rock face. The huge face was considered to be that of an elephant’s. Ancient inscriptions also allude to the name Antakunjarapada, which roughly translates to ‘elephant’s border’.

After taking the flight of stone steps down to the Goa Gajah temple complex, you do not need more than an hour to explore and admire the relic-filled courtyard and view the rock-wall carvings. The site contains a namesake meditational cave, bathing pools and fountains.

Ubud Art Market (Celuk Village, Batuan Village and Mas Village)

The Ubud Art Market is a great place to find beautiful silk scarves, lightweight shirts, statues, kites, handmade woven bags, baskets or hats and many other hand-crafted goods. Locally known as Pasar Seni Ubud, the market is opposite the Puri Saren Royal Ubud Palace and opens daily.

Most of the goods found at the Ubud Market are made in the neighbouring villages of Pengosekan, Tegallalang, Payangan and Peliatan. The location of the Ubud Art Market, which is centred among the art producing villages and at the centre of Ubud itself, makes it a strategic shopping place for Balinese handicrafts and souvenirs.

Ubud Monkey Forest

The Ubud Monkey Forest is home to over 700 grey long-tailed macaques. Also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal, this natural sanctuary has paved pathways through a leafy nutmeg forest and several ancient temples under dense foliage. Thanks to its community-based management, location, and ease of access, Bali is a famous wildlife reserve.

The Ubud Monkey Forest is known for its conservation efforts. Research and studies are regularly conducted to observe the monkeys’ health, diet and breeding habits. You can see these playful primates in their natural habitat, swinging through canopies and feeding bananas.

The forest also has several ancient temples with guardian statues covered in moss. Famous sites include the 14th-century Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal and Pura Prajapati, dedicated to village funerals. Relics and statues are under dense foliage with little sunlight, resulting in a mysterious and ancient vibe.

Banyan tree roots hanging over shadowy dragon staircases offer exotic photo opportunities. You can also find Pura Beji, an ancient bathing temple located northwest of the leading site of Ubud Monkey Forest.

Balinese Coffee Plantation

Did you know Bali is famous for the most expensive coffee globally, made from coffee beans found in the excrement of a small animal that looks like a cross between a ferret and a raccoon?

The most famous and most expensive coffee fastest-growing on this island is Luwak Coffee. This Coffee Luwak Arabica coffee hails from the mystical island of Bali. The coffee is produced from the fermentation process that takes civet coffee beans and then removes them through the digestive tract. Coffee Luwak has a unique history behind the legend. In the early 18th century, the Dutch established coffee plantations on the volcanic islands of the Dutch East Indies.

The process of the bean passing through the digestive tract of the civet chemically alters the proteins in the Kopi Luwak coffee bean to yield more complex and smooth flavours not found in conventional coffees. The resulting coffee is said to be like no other in the world. It has a rich, heavy flavour with caramel and chocolate flavour hints. Some others describe it as earthy, musty and exotic.

Tegallalang Rice Terraces

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces in Ubud are famous for their beautiful scenes of rice paddies and their innovative irrigation system. Known as the subak, the traditional Balinese cooperative irrigation system is said to have been passed down by a revered holy man named Rsi Markandeya in the 8th century. Tegallalang forms the three most splendid terraced landscapes in Ubud’s shared region, with the others being in Pejeng and Campuhan.

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the valley’s far side valleys. The high roadside location is excellent and breezy, and it is a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

Location

Jl. Raya Tegallalang, Tegallalang, Kec. Tegallalang, Kabupaten Gianyar, Bali 80561, Indonesia
10.00 AM – 05.00 PM
Pick Up / Meet-Up Time: 09.00 AM – 10.00 AM

  • Access to Amazing Ubud Half Day Tour
    • Tegenungan Waterfall
    • Elephant Cave (Goa Gajah Temple)
    • Ubud Art Market (Celuk Village, Batuan Village and Mas Village)
    • Ubud Monkey Forest
    • Balinese Coffee Plantation
    • Tegallalang Rice Terraces
  • Air-conditioned vehicle
  • All entrance tickets
  • Local donations
  • Meals: Lunch
  • Bottled water
  • Insurance
  • Hotel transfers
    • Nusa Dua, Kuta, Sanur, Ubud, Canggu, Tanah Lot
  • English-speaking guide

Ubud is a remarkable town in the middle of the island of Bali. It has been the island’s preeminent centre for fine arts, dance, and music for more than a century. While it once was a haven for scruffy backpackers, cosmic seekers, artists and bohemians, Ubud is now a hot spot for literati, glitterati, art collectors and connoisseurs.

Ubud is not “ruined”. Its character is too strong to be destroyed. It still draws people who add something, actively involved in art, nature, anthropology, music, dance, architecture, environmentalism, “alternative modalities,” and more.

Ubud is arguably the best place to use as a base if plan on visiting Bali and looking for culture, comfort, nature, and inspiration. Ubud is surrounded by most things that bring people to Bali.Scenic rice fields, small villages, art and craft communities, ancient temples, palaces, rivers, cheap accommodation and unique luxury hotels. And it’s central location makes it easy to get from Ubud to the mountains, beaches, and major towns.

Tegenungan Waterfall

Tegenungan Waterfall is a great attraction for nature lovers staying in Ubud or having neighbouring Sukawati among their sightseeing itineraries. The waterfall is halfway between Ubud and Bali’s provincial capital of Denpasar. It is considered the closest natural attraction that you can reach within a half-hour drive southeast of Ubud central.

You can go down to the vast pebbly base and enjoy a plunge pool, but this is not advised after heavy downpours due to the risk of flash floods. There are restaurants here that serve excellent local dishes, such as the signature Balinese-style crispy fried duck, which serve as good spots to hang out before or after heading down to Tegenungan Waterfall.

Elephant Cave (Goa Gajah Temple)

The Goa Gajah ‘Elephant Cave’ is an archaeological site on the cool western borders of Bedulu Village, 6 km out of central Ubud. To the unknowing, Goa Gajah’s name can be slightly misleading, often creating an impression that the site is a gigantic dwelling full of elephants.

Even though Goa Gajah translates to ‘Elephant Cave’, you won’t find any pachyderms here. Various theories suggest the origin of the name. One is based on the Petanu River being originally called ‘Lwa Gajah’ before being called Petanu River. Other sources state that the ‘Gajah’ or elephant aspect came in from the stone figure inside the cave, which depicted the Hindu god Ganesh, who is characterised bearing an elephant’s head.

The cave’s entrance shows a menacing giant face with its wide-open mouth as the door. Various motifs depicting the forest and animals are carved out of the outer rock face. The huge face was considered to be that of an elephant’s. Ancient inscriptions also allude to the name Antakunjarapada, which roughly translates to ‘elephant’s border’.

After taking the flight of stone steps down to the Goa Gajah temple complex, you do not need more than an hour to explore and admire the relic-filled courtyard and view the rock-wall carvings. The site contains a namesake meditational cave, bathing pools and fountains.

Ubud Art Market (Celuk Village, Batuan Village and Mas Village)

The Ubud Art Market is a great place to find beautiful silk scarves, lightweight shirts, statues, kites, handmade woven bags, baskets or hats and many other hand-crafted goods. Locally known as Pasar Seni Ubud, the market is opposite the Puri Saren Royal Ubud Palace and opens daily.

Most of the goods found at the Ubud Market are made in the neighbouring villages of Pengosekan, Tegallalang, Payangan and Peliatan. The location of the Ubud Art Market, which is centred among the art producing villages and at the centre of Ubud itself, makes it a strategic shopping place for Balinese handicrafts and souvenirs.

Ubud Monkey Forest

The Ubud Monkey Forest is home to over 700 grey long-tailed macaques. Also known as the Sacred Monkey Forest of Padangtegal, this natural sanctuary has paved pathways through a leafy nutmeg forest and several ancient temples under dense foliage. Thanks to its community-based management, location, and ease of access, Bali is a famous wildlife reserve.

The Ubud Monkey Forest is known for its conservation efforts. Research and studies are regularly conducted to observe the monkeys’ health, diet and breeding habits. You can see these playful primates in their natural habitat, swinging through canopies and feeding bananas.

The forest also has several ancient temples with guardian statues covered in moss. Famous sites include the 14th-century Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal and Pura Prajapati, dedicated to village funerals. Relics and statues are under dense foliage with little sunlight, resulting in a mysterious and ancient vibe.

Banyan tree roots hanging over shadowy dragon staircases offer exotic photo opportunities. You can also find Pura Beji, an ancient bathing temple located northwest of the leading site of Ubud Monkey Forest.

Balinese Coffee Plantation

Did you know Bali is famous for the most expensive coffee globally, made from coffee beans found in the excrement of a small animal that looks like a cross between a ferret and a raccoon?

The most famous and most expensive coffee fastest-growing on this island is Luwak Coffee. This Coffee Luwak Arabica coffee hails from the mystical island of Bali. The coffee is produced from the fermentation process that takes civet coffee beans and then removes them through the digestive tract. Coffee Luwak has a unique history behind the legend. In the early 18th century, the Dutch established coffee plantations on the volcanic islands of the Dutch East Indies.

The process of the bean passing through the digestive tract of the civet chemically alters the proteins in the Kopi Luwak coffee bean to yield more complex and smooth flavours not found in conventional coffees. The resulting coffee is said to be like no other in the world. It has a rich, heavy flavour with caramel and chocolate flavour hints. Some others describe it as earthy, musty and exotic.

Tegallalang Rice Terraces

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces in Ubud are famous for their beautiful scenes of rice paddies and their innovative irrigation system. Known as the subak, the traditional Balinese cooperative irrigation system is said to have been passed down by a revered holy man named Rsi Markandeya in the 8th century. Tegallalang forms the three most splendid terraced landscapes in Ubud’s shared region, with the others being in Pejeng and Campuhan.

The Tegallalang Rice Terraces alone offer a scenic outlook that spreads down before you and away to the valley’s far side valleys. The high roadside location is excellent and breezy, and it is a well-known spot for tourists to stop and take photos. Painters and nature lovers also enjoy visiting this spot, and there are numerous art kiosks and cafés near the ledge.

  • The minimum booking for this attraction / activity is 2 pax
  • Attraction / Activity Duration: 7 hours
  • Child Range: Age 10 and below
  • Not suitable for children under age 3 years and adults above the age of 65 years
  • Adult Range: Age 11 and above
  • Minimum age for this attraction / activity is 3 years old and must be accompanied by an adult
  • This ticket is non-refundable if not redeemed on the selected date
  • If you would like to change your date of visit, please contact the attraction / activity at least two (2) days before your selected date
  • Please note that rescheduling is done on a case-to-case basis and may not be possible at all times
  • You will be fully charged for the attraction / activity if you cancel three (3) days before the selected date
  • Booking must be made 48 hours prior to the selected tour date
  • All tickets are only valid on your selected date
  • To redeem your ticket, please proceed to the attraction’s counters
  • You do not need to print the ticket. Simply present the QR code via your phone
How will I receive my tickets?Once payment is complete, you will instantly receive an email with QR code and attached PDF with your ticket details.
How do I redeem my tickets?Simply present the QR code on your phone at the attraction counter / staff / operator. The attraction will scan your QR code to get the ticket details.
Is this ticket refundable if I do not visit the attraction?Please read the Cancellation Policy and Terms & Conditions for more information.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

You may also like…